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Striped bass

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Striped Bass Fluke Sea bass Porgies Bluefish
         
     
  Cod Fish   Blackfish  
   
 

 

2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations

Season (marine waters)

1 fish over 28 inches in NYS Marine district

April 15th to December 15th

 

The Striped Bass is the most popular game fish on the east coast, as well as one of the best tasting. Stripers are called "rockfish" in the southern states, and can reach weights of over 60 pounds.

East coast striped bass stocks suffered serious declines in the 1980s but stringent management measures involving severe sacrifices by fishermen contributed to a major rebound. Today striper stocks have been declared fully restored. Striped bass spawn during the winter, mostly in the Hudson River and rivers feeding Chessepeak Bay. In the spring stripers move to the coastal waters and migrate to the North and East. We fish for stripers from late April to early December and we fish in many different ways. Check out or fishing hints page

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations  
Size: (Inches) 19 inches
Season: May 4 thru Sept. 30,
Limit Per Person: 4 fish Bag

Fluke, also  known as summer flounder, are easily recognizable because they are flattened from side to side, allowing them to lay flat on sandy or muddy bottom partially burying themselves while waiting for unsuspecting bait fish to come by.

During its larval stage the fluke's the right eye moves to the left side, the upper side, of the fish. This upper side can change from light brown to almost black, allowing the fish to blend in when it is lying on the bottom. The right, or lower, side is white, making the fish difficult to see from below when it is up in the water column. 

Fluke are known as voracious predators. They have sharp teeth and are adept at feeding on smaller fish. Large fluke, known as "doormats" for obvious reasons, can reach upwards of fifteen pounds but the most common size is two to four pounds.

We fish for Fluke in the bay or ocean, drifting with spearing and squid. Fluke bite best when we can drift at about 1 knot. When we fish in the bay we can fish different areas  at different parts of the tide to find the right amount of current for a good drift. When fishing in the ocean there is usually little current, so try to pick a day with some breeze so that we will have enough drift. 10 to 20 mile per hour wind is usually the best.

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations  
Size: (Inches) 15 inches
Season:

June 23 through December 31

 

Limit Per Person:

3 fish June 23 through August 31

7 fish September 1st through December 31st

 

Sea bass, also known as black sea bass, are a mild tasting fish with a firm, white fillet that support a major fishery in New York.  Sea bass are protogynous  hermaphrodites meaning they are females when they are born and at three to four years of age and about  3lbs. they change sex. You can identify the dominant males by the blue bump that develops on their foreheads.

Sea bass have a range that extends from New England to Florida but they are most concentrated off Long Island and New Jersey. They can weigh upwards of five pounds but are most commonly available in the one to three pound range. 

Primarily bottom dwellers, sea bass are fond of frequenting wrecks rocks and reefs. They migrate to deeper offshore waters in the fall and return to the shallower waters as they warm in the spring. We fish for sea bass with clam bait while anchored or drifting very slowly. They are often mixed with porgies and blackfish. Fishing season runs from May to December. Sea bass are easy to catch and double headers are very common when fishing is good.

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations For Party and Charter Boats
Size: (Inches) 9"
Season: May 1 thru Dec. 31
Limit Per Person: 30
Season: September 1st through October 31
Limit Per Person: 45

 

The porgy, which is also known as scup in the Mid-Atlantic region, is a common, bottom dwelling species that supports large recreational and commercial fisheries. Pound for pound it is one of the hardest fighting fish in  the sea.

Porgies have a range that extends from New England to Florida but they are most abundant from Long Island to Massachusetts. They can weigh upwards of five pounds but are most commonly available in the one to two pound range. 

Primarily bottom dwellers, they are fond of frequenting wrecks and other undersea structures. They migrate to deeper offshore waters in the fall and return to the shallower waters as they warm in the spring.

We catch porgies with clam bait anchored or slowly drifting on bay and ocean wrecks and reefs. They are most abundant in our area from July through December and are often mixed with sea bass and blackfish.

 

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations  

Size:

(Inches)

First 10 - No Minimum. Next 5 - fish12" Minimum

Season: All Year
Limit Per Person: 15

 

In the warmer weather the bluefish is one of the most common inhabitants of the inshore and near coastal waters in the Mid-Atlantic region. Ranging in size from small "snappers" of under a pound in weight to giant "slammers" weighing over twenty pounds, bluefish provide recreational opportunities and first-class table fare to millions of people each year. 

Bluefish are commonly found in the estuaries and the coastal waters of every state from Maine to Florida. They are in Long Island waters from May until November.

 

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations

 

Season (marine waters)

2 fish April 1st to April 30th    4 fish Oct. 15th to Dec. 22nd
Size: (Inches) 16 inches

 

The blackfish, also known as tautog, (Tautoga onitis) ranges from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. It lives along the coast in rocky areas and may be found near pilings, jetties and wrecks. It is commonly taken at fishing reefs in the Atlantic Ocean just south of Long Island. Tautogs can grow to 3 feet or about 22 pounds, but most fish are between 2 and 8 pounds. Blackfish feed mostly on mussels, clams and crabs and only feed during the day. The greenish coloration in the fins is caused by this fish's diet, primarily blue mussels. And yes, they are a delicious food fish! We fish for blackfish with crabs anchored over ocean and bay wrecks. Blackfish like to get inside wrecks or between rocks and at night they sleep with their heads down and their tails up.

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2019  
New York State Fishing Regulations

Season (marine waters)

22" Minimum size, 10 bag

limit no closed season

 

The Codfish is perhaps the most prolific fish in the sea. Since the seventeenth century large fleets have fished for cod on both sides of the North Atlantic. It wasn’t until after the Second World War that fishing technology advanced to a point where commercial fishermen were able to catch codfish faster than they could reproduce, causing their stocks to collapse in the 1970’s. Over the last five decades severe restrictions on commercial and recreational fishermen have caused a rebound in the cod fishery.

Codfish can reach weights of over one hundred pounds. Fish from 4 through 12lbs are most common.

Long Island is located at the southern end of the codfish’s range. For that reason we only catch cod in our inshore waters when they are at there coldest from Jamuary through April. Deep water wreck 150 through 300ft hold fish year round.

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